Technical Interviews: Show Your Working

When I was in grade-school math class, the teachers would always implore us to show our working. When answering a question, you wouldn’t always get to the right answer, but if you could show you’d approach the problem in the right way then there were still marks to be awarded. You should take exactly the … Continue reading Technical Interviews: Show Your Working

Minimum Viable Interview Research

The more you understand the process of an upcoming technical interview, the more you’ll be setting yourself up for success. The more you know what to expect, the more confident you’re likely to be in the interview itself. What’s below is a list of things I’d recommend trying to find out before the interview. Some … Continue reading Minimum Viable Interview Research

Understand the Process

Recruiting good people is hard. Far too hard for the recruiters, HR people, and technical managers who are the people who actually do all the recruitment. To make life notionally easier for everyone, there are processes that are put in place and must be followed come hell or high water. Deviation from these processes causes … Continue reading Understand the Process

Prove, don’t say

Consider the following excerpt from the skills section of a resume: AWS (EC2, related services), Puppet, load balancing What does that mean? Does it mean… “I’ve got a lot of personal experience of lovingly setting up a whole bunch of immutable infrastructure with auto-scaling instances in the cloud, and helping my team migrate to it?” … Continue reading Prove, don’t say

How a recruiter speed-reads your resume

Long before I was a recruiter, I was a programmer. One of the skill-sets I know pretty well is JavaScript, both back-end and front-end. It takes me less than a minute to read and make a decision on whether I will send a JavaScript programmer CV / resume on to my clients, which incidentally is … Continue reading How a recruiter speed-reads your resume

Counter offers can be great, be wary of recruiters suggesting otherwise

Aims of recruiters are not always well aligned with the aims of the people they’re trying to find jobs for. A particularly egregious example of this is recruiters writing opinion pieces on why you should never accept a counter-offer — that is, your original employer offering to match (or better) the salary somewhere else has … Continue reading Counter offers can be great, be wary of recruiters suggesting otherwise

When two job titles are better than one

One of the very few things that can be fact-checked on your CV / resume is your employment history. That you “pioneered the use of continuous deployment” in your last role is just like, your opinion, man, but that you were employed by XYZ Corp from 17th of February to 9th of September as Senior … Continue reading When two job titles are better than one

Can you pretend to be normal for up to two hours?

Every company sucks at interviewing. Plenty of companies (and individuals at companies) think they’re really really good at interviewing, but mostly they’ve just gotten lucky. You’re never going to learn in a 2 to 12 hour interview programme what it’ll be like to sit next to someone day to day, share large bodies of work … Continue reading Can you pretend to be normal for up to two hours?

Who cares if developers want to get paid more?

Nobody cares as much as you do about your salary. One reason I like to stress to developers that they should understand how the mechanics of interviews work is so that they understand the motivations of all the players, especially when it comes to salary — who doesn’t want to know how to get paid … Continue reading Who cares if developers want to get paid more?